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I can see the reason for "you need reputation to upvote". But I should be able to upvote answers to my question, since there could be more than one answers that work but only one that can be accepted.

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  • I like the idea... – nanofarad May 18 '12 at 12:29
  • Are you arguing generally that users should require less reputation to upvote answers on their own questions, or no reputation? Also, what about downvoting--should users with low reputation (or even just 1 reputation) be able to downvote answers on their own questions as well? Starting from the idea that new users should be able to upvote answers on their questions, I can see reasonable positions both ways about downvotes, and I'm wondering what you think. I'd suggest editing your question to address these issues. – Eliah Kagan Aug 29 '12 at 5:52
  • Basically I just feel "guilty" when somebody helps me, but I cannot "reward" him/her by upvoting his/her answer. – Ron Aug 29 '12 at 6:09
  • I think, you can reward him/her with accepting the answer by clicking the gray tick mark on the left side of the answer. – Anwar Aug 29 '12 at 18:00
  • @Anwar That is addressed in the question, in which Ron explains that he is particularly concerned with cases where more than one answer helped. – Eliah Kagan Aug 29 '12 at 22:57
4

You need 15 reputation points to upvote, even for answers on your own question. It isn't that hard to get 15 points: 3 upvotes on one or more question will do it, or 2 upvotes plus 2 questions where you accept an answer.

Once you reach 15 points, you can come back to your questions and upvote answers.

It is by design that voting, even on answers to your own questions (or to questions that you've answered), requires a small amount of positive participation. Before you can start formally giving your opinion on other posts (by voting), you need to make a small recognized contribution to the community. This requirement also makes some forms of vote fraud more difficult (if you attempt to make multiple accounts in order for them to vote for each other).

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