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This question (starting container process caused: error loading seccomp filter into kernel: loading seccomp filter: errno 524: unknown) is on-topic, right? The host OS is Ubuntu 20.04, and the container OS is Ubuntu 14.04.

In my opinion, containers are the exact solution to running ancient stuff without polluting your base system.

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    In some sense I'd think if we made these offtopic, a bunch of snaps (possibly even official ones) would become offtopic too, because snaps are a form of containers that are sometimes based on old releases of Ubuntu
    – muru
    Nov 2 at 14:44
  • Yes - except snaps are based on Ubuntu core, which has an official support period of 10 years. Nov 2 at 14:51
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    @Artur Meinild: After rereading my question about Core in Meta and yours in AU, I am still not sure if Core is on-topic. I would like it to be, as well as all other versions of Ubuntu, up to EOL, but LTS versions are abandoned by AU after EoSS, which is five years, even though Canonical's definition of EoL is 10 years. I think AU made up the term "End of Standard Support" shortly after Extended Security Maintenance was released. I would like to see something official about Core support in AU Help. Nov 4 at 10:45
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    Last time I got excited about EoSS vs EoL, I got suspended for a week. Nov 4 at 10:48

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Yeah. On-topic.

People can focus on the minutia, make arguments about kicking it off to another site or demanding they update the container (how? it's not booting!) but we have to remember we're here to help people.

The host system seems to be the problem here. Let's help them rather than mummify them in red tape.

If it does transpire to be a problem in the container, that serves as a good answer for other people bumping into the same problems with their older containers. Because people do deliberately run on old-version-Ubuntu containers because that's the only way people can run their software. I've had to do that for local services that have been uneconomical to upgrade.

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  • I thought so - but I suddenly became unsure. I pointed David to this thread to learn as well. Nov 2 at 13:56
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    "Mummify in red tape" .. Haven't heard that one before! 😁 Nov 2 at 13:59
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    @ArturMeinild Agreed - Bookmarked (err, "Saved") since I'm going to be quoting this one at some point, I'm sure! ;-) Nov 2 at 21:21
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At first, this seems like an ideal solution.

But are we allowed to ask questions about the containerized OS if it is past EoSS? Or just about the container?

If so, we should stop playing games and go back to allowing questions up to EOL (with or without ESM).

If Canonical can support an LTS version for ten years, I am sure Ask Ubuntu also has enough talent to do likewise.

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    I would say only about the container itself. What ancient OS (and whatever OS that might be) runs inside the container would almost certainly be out of scope of the site. Nov 3 at 9:04
  • If "containers are the exact solution to running ancient stuff" but we are not allowed to tell people to put ancient stuff in a container or how, I don't see the point of this question. Will 12.04 go into a container exactly the same as 22.10? Nov 4 at 11:19
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In this, I'd say we should treat them like VMs. We can help with getting the containers to start, and problems with interfacing the containers with host (like networking), but problems that are purely inside the containers would be out of scope if the OS inside the container is out-of-scope.

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