1

While reviewing posts, I noticed these two tags: and .

I feel both these tags have similar scope. So should we merge these tags?

3

Examining the questions in the tag reveals that its scope is, as might be expected, broader than the scope of . After all there are various types of drives that wouldn't usually be called "hard drives", such as floppy disks, USB flash drives, solid state drives (SSD) and so on.

Perhaps the tag has excessively broad scope. My preference would be to review the questions with that tag and retag them with more precise tags for specific types of drive, such as , or remove the tag where it is not descriptive of the question's subject.

4
  • 1
    The excerpt of drive tag states "Use this tag if you have problems using HDs or SSDs in Ubuntu.". So the scope of the tag has been defined but users misunderstood the scope and used the tag in wrong situations (like for pen-drive related questions). Am I right? And yeah, the word "drive" could refer to multiple kinds of drives, so the users got confused about the scope of tag because of the inappropriate name of tag. – Random Person Jul 5 at 17:45
  • 2
    I would argue the tag's wiki is the problem, not the tag name. Just change the excerpt so that it covers any kind of drive, HD, SSD, USB, floppy, tape etc. – terdon Jul 5 at 19:17
  • 1
    @terdon I agree that the wiki is the problem, but what's the use of having such a broad tag when more specific tags can cover its entire scope? – Zanna Jul 6 at 6:36
  • 1
    Well, I don't mind broad tags in cases where someone can be an "expert" on it or might want to follow questions with it and since all drives are basically dealt with in the same way (they have a volume that needs to be mounted, sometimes manually, sometimes through fstab or udev or gvfs etc) so I can see why a general drive tag could be useful. If we only have specific sub-tags, then someone who likes to answer questions about managing disks in general would have to follow each of them. If there's a more specific tag that covers the entire scope that's different, of course. Which one? – terdon Jul 6 at 10:15

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .