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So occasionally around the place (on Meta) I see "Since you are a veteran" or "Veterans have this privilege".

For example, here.

How much rep does a user have to have to be considered a veteran?

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    define "veteran" – Braiam Jul 25 '14 at 15:05
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    I don't know what instance or usage you are referring to, but in my book a veteran isn't based on how much rep you have, it is based on how long you have been here and how active you've been. – Seth Jul 25 '14 at 15:12
  • @Braiam That's what I'm asking! What is a veteran on SO? – Tim Jul 25 '14 at 15:19
  • 2k rep would definitely put you in the "regular user, doesn't need to know about every little badge" category.. Other than that, veteran doesn't have a solid "definition". – Seth Jul 25 '14 at 16:32
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    I think what Oded means in that answer is that you have a a fairly large amount of rep - time probably doesn't matter that much in this case, even though many people's rep increases over time. The boring way to look as this would be a dictionary - and since I don't think there have been any SE 'wars' as such (apart from some insistent post editors), a person with 'long experience in any particular activity' could be the best definition. 'Veteran' could even refer to a established user. – Wilf Jul 25 '14 at 16:34
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My guess is that "veteran" has to be taken in context of the conversation. For example, in this conversation "verteran" presumedy would refer to users with both 3K + reputation and experience in reviewing close votes on SE.

Short answer - verteran implies not only reputation, but also some experience with the topic at hand.

You might also find the privileges page useful.

  • Veteran can also trump reputation, in the case of if I were a newbie here, but were actually extremely well versed in something like nginx (which I am since I package it). But yes, this is an accurate assessment. – Thomas Ward Jul 15 '15 at 17:53

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